Gone Floatabout

Sailing, Photography, Wilderness


18 Comments

50,000 sea miles

Setting moon on Pacific crossing

Moon setting at dawn on our second Pacific crossing

So, to spill the beans… this summer when we were all out-of-touch and offline, we were sailing across the Pacific again. This second Pacific Ocean crossing was quite different from our first one in 2007, but more on that in a later post. I’m still processing the whole experience in my head (and in my photo file folders!), so for now this post is just a fun little look back:

  • When we crossed the Pacific this time, it had been 11 years since our first Pacific crossing.
  • It had been 8 years since we were last in the Southern Hemisphere,
  • and 7 years since we’d sailed in the Tropics.

    Dominica

    One of our last tropical ports on our circumnavigation

  • So that means we’ve now been sailing offshore for 12 years! (on and off, it hasn’t been full time all that time.) Here’s a fun little slideshow of highs and lows aboard HERETIC and CELESTE:
  • The crossing this summer was our 4th transoceanic passage. 

    Passage to Africa

    Moon on a beautiful evening en route to Africa,  towards the end of our 2nd transoceanic passage

  • We’ve also sailed across  4 seas – the Caribbean, the Coral Sea, the Arafura Sea, the Bering, and the Chukchi – and across 4 “gulfs” – the Gulf of Maine, the Gulf of Alaska, the Gulf of Panama, and the Gulf of Carpentaria.

    Cross-swell

    Waves breaking on St Paul Island, central Bering Sea

  • We’ve been 3 times across the Equator and twice across the Arctic Circle. 

    Crossing the Arctic Circle

    Across the Arctic Circle

  • And partway through this summer’s Pacific crossing, we passed 50,000 nautical miles sailed, and said a prayer of thanks to the sturdy vessels that have taken us so far.


31 Comments

Passage to San Francisco (October 2017)

Passage to SF-2Last winter, while we were living aboard and working on CELESTE in Port Angeles, we discovered just how frequent and how deep the low pressure systems that hit the Pacific Northwest can be. So this year, after returning to Port Angeles from our Alaskan cruising, we were determined to get south of their tracks before the winter pattern began.  Continue reading