Gone Floatabout

Sailing, Photography, Wilderness


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Social Hour in Seward

On Harding IcefieldAfter our cruise from Kodiak, we’d intended Seward to be a work stop, and while we did manage to squeeze our work in somehow, Seward ended up being an insanely social stop. It started on the evening of our arrival when we rafted to a French motor yacht with whom we’d crossed paths – but not yet met – in Kodiak, the Katmai, and Kenai Fjords. Continue reading


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Prince William Sound and Kenai Fjords, Alaska, June 2017

Whale in Prince William SoundWe left the Inside Passage behind for our third Gulf of Alaska crossing on June 9, 2017 and had an easy passage except that first I, and then Seth, came down with some sort of flu. I think we may have caught it from a few people who were sick at Baranof Warm Springs. It didn’t manifest itself until the second day – the first day was very pleasant sailing with a moderate south swell and light south wind. We were sailing a close reach because the apparent wind was so much further forward (due to Celeste‘s speed) than the true wind. On the second day, the sailing was still good, with the wind up and down in strength but steady in direction from the south. By the afternoon, though, I had started to develop a headache and fever that persisted almost until we raised the islands off Prince William Sound. It was made rather worse on Day 3 by the wind dying but the swell increasing – a nauseating combination. Seth came down with the bad headache/fever as well on that day. Fortunately the sailing/motoring was easy, so we didn’t have to work too hard while we were ill. We both recovered on Day 4 and by evening we came into Prince William Sound and anchored a few hours later in a lovely, deserted spot on Knight Island. Continue reading


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Glaciers, bears, and crossing the Gulf of Alaska: Kodiak to Ketchikan, July 2016

Sunset on Kodiak IslandWe wrote our last post from Kodiak, a wonderful town where we met a lot of very friendly people. As well as completing necessary chores like laundry, internet, fuel, and groceries, we had fun hiking the hill behind town. We really fell in love with the island of Kodiak, though, when we left town to sail to a deserted bay. Deserted, that is, except for humpback whales, sea otters with babies, and hundreds of puffins and auklets! Continue reading


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All kinds of weather on the Alaska Peninsula

Making dinner: spaghetti and homemade meatballs!

Making dinner: spaghetti and homemade meatballs!

The hours seemed to fly by as we talked with John (the captain of Kittiwake—see last post) and we only realized the time when it got dark and a light rain started to fall.  John had to get going.  He wanted to get Kittiwake to her next anchorage before the SE winds and waves came: he didn’t want to waste fuel by bucking into headwinds and headseas if he didn’t have to.  The southeasterly would come early in the morning and would be favorable for us, so after dinner we made everything shipshape on Celeste and then lingered in the cockpit, watching the bears once more. We’d seen all sorts of behavior by the bears during our time in the little bay: cubs playing, mothers corralling cubs, bears fishing, the bear that bluff-charged us, young bears play-fighting and flirting. But that night we saw one more and it seemed so sweet: a mother-daughter clamming expedition! A mother and her yearling cub – who was almost as big as she was – were on the beach nearest Celeste digging in the mud, swiping up clams in their claws, and eating them. We watched them until it got too dark to see (it was already too dark for photos) and then finally went to bed. Continue reading


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Kenai Peninsula Redux

Kenai ZEAL blogCheck out the best snippets of our Kenai adventures shared on the blog of our sponsor ZEAL Optics!  There’s also a couple more photos we haven’t posted to Gone Floatabout 🙂 Enjoy!

http://blog.zealoptics.com/post/108828158177/kenai-peninsula-with-gone-floatabout

Back to the story of the Alaska Peninsula next post!


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Passage to the Alaska Peninsula, August 19-20, 2014

August 19 GRIBJust as the NOAA radio forecasts and our OCENS WeatherNet files predicted, August 19 dawned with almost no wind under a light fog.  Of course these are not ideal seagoing conditions, especially for a sailboat!  But we figured we’d take it: we have a good radar with a chart overlay that we installed in Port Angeles; we’re pretty used to fog from sailing in Maine; and, considering we have a new and reliable engine, no wind was better than the strong contrary winds of the day we’d originally tried to depart. Continue reading