Gone Floatabout

Sailing, Photography, Wilderness


10 Comments

A day in the life… of working from home

Inspired by the Bartleby column in last week’s issue of The Economist“Diary of a home worker: The challenges of concentrating during a lockdown” practically had me in stitches. If you subscribe to The Economist, don’t miss it!

In the spirit that imitation is the highest praise, here’s my (lightly fictionalized) “diary”:

6:10 Wake up and look at the clock. Hold inner debate about going for a run this morning. Roll over.

6:30 Reach for phone to see if running buddy has texted to cancel. She has! Breathe a sigh of relief and text back “No worries – tuckered out from our 9 miles the other day…”

6:31 Receive reply from running buddy saying she’s wiped out from home-schooling her 7th grader with his short attention span and inability to focus on Zoom classes. Text back and thus begin conversation on pros and cons of technology.

7:12 Realize been texting with running buddy for over 40 minutes! And it was all about the internet sucking up time! Oh, the irony. Text goodbye and jump out of bed.

7:15 Open cornflakes box and realize it’s running low. Panic that the store won’t have anymore. Realize with relief that there are 5 more boxes in the pantry from the last Costco run a month ago before Costco started limiting the number of customers and what they could buy. Idly wonder when official rationing will arrive.

7:20 Take coffee and cornflakes out on the porch and stare at the ocean. Happily some things never change. Like The Morning Stare. The ritual of staring at the blue horizon, coffee in hand, is the same at sea or ashore. The best part of the day.

8:00 Start to feel guilty about not sitting down to work. Compromise by looking at emails, most of which are from banks about how they are dealing with covid-19. They’re really just trying to calm us all down so we don’t withdraw all our money. Delete.

8:15 Look over spread sheet of accepted or published articles for which money is owed. Check bank statements to make sure nothing is incorrect. Email editors to remind them of money owed.

8:30 Open blank word document and stare, waiting for inspiration.

8:32 Go to the bathroom.

8:34 Glance over List of Ideas. Decide that all of them will probably be considered callous in view of the pandemic. Has to be about the pandemic.

8:45 Look up news articles about covid-19. Disappear down the rabbit hole.

10:00 Run across article about practicing mindfulness during the pandemic. Get up from computer and sit on the floor to try it out.

10:03 Stomach rumbles. Go fetch a snack. English muffin? Bananas? Go for bananas: they grow in the yard so won’t be affected by rationing or store closures.

10:17 Go back to blank word document.

10:20 Running buddy texts with idea for social coffee break over Zoom. Rush to change out of pajamas and move laundry basket out of view of the computer’s camera.

10:40 Go back to blank word document.

10:41 Look up from desk at Dad’s watercolor of childhood home in British Columbia. Sigh nostalgically for the days when crossing the US-Canada border required only a driver’s license.

10:43 Sigh nostalgically for the days, three weeks ago, when crossing borders was even allowed at all.

10:45 Wonder if will get to see friends from other countries ever again.

10:46 Wonder if will even get to see friends in the continental US ever again.

10:47 Close eyes and remember to be grateful for all the things done and seen in life. Sigh with relief and gratitude for not being sick with the virus.

10:48 Wonder if have in fact contracted covid-19. Go wash hands vigorously. Wipe down keyboard and phone.

10:50 Check email to see if editors have responded about outstanding payments. They haven’t. Start composing long overdue replies to personal emails.

11:46 Tsunami alert siren goes off. Remember that it’s the first day of the month and it’s only the regular test.

11:47 Nuclear missile alert siren goes off. It’s also a test. Or is it the world’s worst April Fool’s joke? Or is it for real?? Are the conspiracy theorists correct??!! Is that what’s next after Bio Weapon Covid-19??? Panic!!

11:49 Breathe deeply. Console self with knowledge that that brief spurt of covid-19 panic buying will also provide food for weeks in the fall-out shelter. What fall-out shelter? There aren’t any. Shrug. Go back to emails.

NOON Reach the emails from Francophone friends which must be replied to in French. Re-read them all. Decide just don’t have the energy.

12:03 Open the fridge and stare, wondering what to make for lunch. Salad on the grounds the lettuce is the most perishable? Grilled cheese sandwiches because vaguely depressed and comfort food sounds really good right now? Decide on salad since didn’t go for that run this morning.

12:40 Finish salad and eat a piece of bread and cheese anyway.

12:47 Eat a square of chocolate. Eat a second.

12:55 Go back to blank word document.

13:00 Go out for a walk before that rain cloud that’s hovering to the south gets any closer.

13:10 Happen upon neighbor also out for walk. Feel awkward and embarrassed about standing 6 feet apart to converse.

13:20 Decide that intended short walk will be much longer. Feels so good to be out of the house.

14:08 Starts to rain.

15:00 Return from 7-mile walk, drenched from the rain. It was worth it. So much healthier than sitting in front of the computer.

15:02 Take a hot shower, put on dry clothes, and make a cup of tea and a piece of toast and jam. Start to read The Economist.

16:15 Realize been reading The Economist for an hour. Quickly wash up tea things.

16:17 Remember haven’t returned call from friend on the East Coast. Realize it’s too late again now with the time change.

16:18 Go back to blank word document.

16:19 An idea comes! It’s both sailing and pandemic related!

19:30 Stomach rumbles. Just want to finish this paragraph….

19:35 Can’t ignore stomach any longer. Go make dinner.

19:50 Stir the curry around again in the pot. That’ll make it cook faster.

19:51 Do the same to the rice.

20:05 Finally sit down to dinner.

20:30 Wash up dishes. Hold inner debate about going to bed immediately after eating. Tell self once again that earlier dinner would really be healthier.

20:40 Sit down to read. What to choose? The Tao Te Ching to try and get mindful? Ayn Rand to get riled up about the end of civil liberties around the world? On the Beach for some end-of-the-world prophecy? More covid-19 in The Economist? James Michener’s big ol’ tome Hawaii that’s been on the reading list since moving to the overseas territory (ahem, state)?

20:41 Pick up a murder mystery.

21:30 Bed time!


6 Comments

Whales!

Since everyone seems to have a different date for World Whale Day, I figured today was as good a day as any to share some whale photos 🙂

The humpback whales are here in Hawaii for the winter – saw five just the other day, including a baby! Seeing whales from a little outrigger canoe is possibly even more exciting than seeing them from CELESTE – one is so much closer to the water and very aware that the whale is a 40-ton creature and the canoe is a very tippy 40-pounds (she’s made of carbon fiber, hence why she’s so lightweight – and fast and fun!). Didn’t get any photos of the whales from the canoe (didn’t bring the camera), but here are some from back up in Alaska:

Breaching whale

Humpback whale seen from CELESTE in Southeast Alaska, 2014.

This is probably my favorite. I love how well it captures coastal Alaska – the rocky shoreline, the steep forest climbing up and up in background, the wispy clouds, the cool, overcast weather, and, of course, the star of the show, the breaching whale. Do you see the two black specks above him? Those are bald eagles… gives you a sense of how immense this landscape is….

Bubble-net-feeding whales

Humpbacks bubble-net feeding in Southeast Alaska, 2017.

Here’s another image I love. These whales are bubble-net feeding in the deep water right off the shore. Bubble-net feeding is a clever and cooperative technique that humpback whales use to corral small fish and krill into balls, whereupon the whales burst up through the center of the fish ball, mouths open wide, to enjoy their feast! There is incredible footage of this in the new BBC documentary Seven Worlds, One Planet – Antarctica. Highly recommended!

Gray whale tail

Grey whale diving off Mexico, 2018.

Here’s a grey whale in Bahia Magdalena, Baja, Mexico. Grey whales make the longest migration of any mammal, more than 6000 miles each way between the Arctic and tropical waters. It was pretty exciting to see these grey whales in Mexico after having seen them in the Arctic. Just like it’s wonderful to see the humpbacks here in Hawaii after having seen so many up in Alaska!

Spinner dolphins

Spinner dolphins, Hawaii, 2019.

Obviously these aren’t whales, but as I don’t have any pictures of whales from Hawaii, I thought I’d throw in spinner dolphins instead. I love spinner dolphins – they’re so playful and they often show up around the outrigger canoe. It’s always so much fun to jump in the water with them. Though this photo was actually taken while scuba diving – this was a wonderful dive!

 


8 Comments

2020…

I’m not sure I’m ready for a new decade… so here are some of my favorite photos from the last one – I’ve chosen one photo from each year, though narrowing it down like that wasn’t easy!

Dawn Landfall, St Helena

Landfall on St Helena Island, South Atlantic, 2010

I love this photo of landfall on the British island of St Helena in the South Atlantic. For me it captures the wonder of sighting land after days at sea – the dawn light, the mountainous island, and the lonely ocean all around. St Helena is still one of the world’s most remote islands, but was even more remote in 2010 when access was still solely by sea.

Ellen trekking in the Alps

Trekking in the Alps, 2011

I love the mountains as much as the sea, and this image reminds me of some of my favorite treks, walking for days high up above treeline in the Alps. I love the silence of it, and the fresh cold air, and the immense vistas of the peaks crowned in ice.

Ski-touring in the Alps

Backcountry skiing in the Alps, 2012

I had a tough time picking out just one from 2012, one of the best snow years we had while living in Switzerland, but settled on this one of me on one of our biggest backcountry ski trips of year. Backcountry skiing essentially means hiking up mountains and skiing down them in wilderness areas away from resorts/infrastructure, etc. Like winter generally, a person either loves it or hates it. I love it, which made it fun to gain the skills and knowledge necessary for it (the danger of avalanches and rockfalls is very real). When this photo was taken I had only learned to ski two years previously… so I’m kind of proud of it 🙂

Fall in the vineyards.jpg

Alpine vineyards in autumn, 2013

There’s something about this image that captures the crisp air of autumn, that hint that winter is on its way. Even though the vineyards are still green, the overcast sky combined with the snowline and the red vine over the clôture give that sense of the changing seasons and the shortening days.

Bears fishing-2

Brown bears fish for salmon, Alaska Peninsula, 2014

It’s hard to choose an image from CELESTE’s first real voyage in 2014, but observing these bears on the Alaska Peninsula was probably the biggest highlight of the trip. These brown (grizzly) bears, well fed off the salmon coming up the river to spawn, seemed to tolerate each other in close proximity. To anchor CELESTE in this nearly landlocked bay (can you find her in the picture?) and to watch these impressive predators fish made for one of the most memorable weeks in all my years sailing.

Whalebone iglu

Whalebone iglu, North Slope, Alaska, 2015

Once again, it was hard to pick just one photo from voyaging to the Arctic in 2015. How to choose among the surreal beauty of the polar pack ice, the flocks of migrating birds so thick as to darken the sky, the midnight sun just barely touching the horizon, and the photogenic if somewhat unnerving sight of spray blowing off the crest of a wave in a gale? Instead, though, I chose this moment, capturing the interior of an old whalebone and sod iglu on the North Slope, a home still inhabited as late as the mid-1970s. The Inupiat elder at the entrance, who was born in one of these iglus, became friend and host during our stay at anchor off his village, showing us around, introducing us to his friends, and recounting the history of this incredible place. If we had done nothing else and seen nothing else, our sail to the Arctic would have been worth it for this.

Alpine Waterfall

Hidden waterfall in the Alps, 2016

I had to put in one more Alpine image for 2016, the year we said goodbye to Switzerland. Coming around a turning in the trail, I caught sight of this magnificent waterfall, tucked away in my favorite part of the range, a fairly empty region that requires at least two days on foot to reach. This was our last big trek in the Alps before we left in the fall to return to the States.

St Elias Range

Stillness at dawn, Alaska, 2017

This is one of my favorite images of Alaska; it distills so much of what I love about the Great Land. There are the immense mountains, of course – in this case the St Elias Range, rising 18,000 feet from sea level – and the wild conifer forests, and the hardy little fishing boat heading out of harbor. But there’s also the beauty of a still, clear dawn after weeks of rain and wind, and the urge to make the most of it, especially as you can tell that the fleeting summer season is already gone and winter close at hand. You can almost taste the salty smell of low tide and feel the cold bite of the autumn air on the tip of your nose. 2017 was the last summer aboard CELESTE in Alaska, and by autumn her lockers were well stocked with jars of salmon – wild-caught, smoked, and pressure canned on board.

Celeste in mid-Pacific

Crossing the Pacific, 2018

I love this image for the sense it gives of the immensity of the ocean. It’s arguable that the ocean is the world’s wildest wilderness, in that humans cannot survive on it without man-made equipment (flotation, protection from exposure, fresh water storage), and I think this photograph captures some of that sense of one’s smallness and vulnerability out there. This was taken in the ‘doldrums’ (the Intertropical Convergence Zone), the band of inconsistent, squally weather around the equator, while crossing of the Pacific for the second time. The 3,000-mile trip took 23 days sailing, from Mexico to the Marquesas Islands of French Polynesia.

Stars coming out over Hualalai

Watching the stars come out from Mauna Kea, Hawai’i, 2019

Taken on the island of Hawai’i, from about 9,500 feet on Mauna Kea (Hawai’i’s tallest mountain at 14,000 feet), this long exposure shot captures more light than is visible to the naked eye, and so one can see both the last rays of the tropical sunset and the stars already glittering in the clear night sky.  “Glittering”, however, is just a figure of speech: the air above Mauna Kea is in fact so undisturbed that the stars cease to have that “twinkling” quality one sees most other places. Mauna Kea is a truly special place: despite its tropical location, its heights are quite cold and even retain snowfall in winter; and despite its volcanic cinder geology, it has that same stillness and silence I’ve so appreciated in the Alps and other continental ranges.

 

 

 

 

 


6 Comments

BoKoa Farms and Forest Video

I recently created a video for BoKoa Farms and Forest, an off-grid farm on slopes of Mauna Kea on the island of Hawai’i. They practice restorative forestry, reducing invasive plant species and propagating native and endemic ones. Specifically, they remove strawberry guava and chip it, creating a great product for use in grilling and smoking: the wood chips impart a really nice flavor to all kinds of meat and veggies. In the cleared land, they propagate Koa seedlings, reforesting the land with these beautiful native trees. It’s a great cause and a creative way of addressing a problem that exists throughout the Hawaiian islands.

The video tells this story, along with an explanation on how to use the wood chips in your grill.


8 Comments

Hiking Mauna Loa

 

Mauna Loa lava flows

Mauna Loa’s lava flows clearly visible

Mauna Loa, one of the two 4000-meter peaks on the island of Hawai’i, is the largest volcano on earth, as measured by volume. It’s still active: the last flow, in 1984, came within 4 miles of the town of Hilo. Raw black lava flows mark its flanks, and sometimes you can see it smoking.

Up in the thin, dry air on Mauna Loa is a wilderness of brittle lava rock, an immense caldera, and harsh tropical sun. The temperatures are cold – it snows – and the wind howls, but the sun remains at its brutal tropical angle. Sounds like a fantastic hike, right?

Hiking up Mauna Loa

Can you find me amidst all the lava? Hiking up the first section of the trail, Maui in the far background.

You can’t not do it, though: a 4000-meter peak that’s not a technical climb is pretty much impossible for hikers like us to pass up. So Seth and I summited Mauna Loa in September 2018. After many months aboard CELESTE at sea level, it was quite the challenge….

I wrote up the story of our hike for our sponsor Katadyn on their blog. You can read it here.

Mauna Loa at sunset

Mauna Loa seen at sunset from Mauna Kea (yes, that’s snow in the foreground. Aloha!)


10 Comments

Home Ashore

Many of you know that we moved to Hawaii. For those of you who don’t, I realize how unexpected that must seem, especially after so much time sailing and so much time in cold places. The reason was primarily that Seth’s workload had increased to the point where he could no longer work from the boat.

Sailing in the Marquesas

No WiFi out here… South Pacific 2018

Trying to have a career while living aboard, let alone sailing to remote (read: without internet) places, is really hard. The confined space of a sailboat must serve both for sailing and living; adding career-type work to that is tough. So a land base became necessary. Fortunately, Seth’s remote work enabled us to choose almost anywhere in American territory that had good internet: we weren’t confined to a specific region or city. Hawaii might still sound like an unexpected choice given our seeming penchant for cold places. That penchant has really been mostly mine, however, and when picking a place to live, my Alaskan suggestions were never going to beat out Hawaii’s year-round coral reef scuba diving…

Many friends in Alaska had ties to Hawaii, too, which is what first put it on our radar as a place to live. So in October 2017, when it became clear we’d need to stop sailing so much and work ashore, we flew to Hawaii to scope it out, and thereafter we only sailed for a month or two at a time, continuing our voyage south and then across the Pacific in May 2018, in stages and working in between. Life on Hawaii pretty much took over from sailing after that. The island has a lot to offer: I’m always finding new beautiful places, making new friends, and learning new things, such as outrigger canoe paddling. Here are some photos of this lovely place: