Gone Floatabout

Sailing, Photography, Wilderness


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Honored with Young Voyager Award from the Cruising Club of America

2019 CCA Young Voyager

Receiving the Young Voyager Award from CCA Commodore Brad Willauer. Photo courtesy of Dan Nerney.

Seth and I were incredibly honored to receive the Cruising Club of America’s Young Voyager Award this year. Recognizing “a young sailor who has made one or more exceptional voyages,” the award is relatively new among the CCA’s prestigious sailing medals. Given the two previous Young Voyager recipients, and given the club’s history of honoring truly exceptional sailors, we were bowled over to be this year’s awardees!

2019 Young Voyager acceptance remarks

Acceptance remarks for the CCA Young Voyager Award at the ceremony in the Model Room of the New York Yacht Club. Photo courtesy of Dan Nerney.

We traveled to New York to attend the awards dinner at the New York Yacht Club on March 1st, and what a gathering it was! So many amazing sailors from around the world, ocean voyagers and racers with fascinating stories and mind-boggling accomplishments. And all of them so humble and understated about it. To name but a few, we so enjoyed talking with Jessica Watson, the Australian woman who, in 2010, was the youngest person to sail solo nonstop around the world at age 16, and who was last year’s Young Voyager awardee. Bruce Halabisky and Tiffany Loney and their two daughters were the wonderfully down-to-earth family who received the club’s highest award, the Blue Water Medal, for their 11-year circumnavigation aboard their wooden, gaff-rigged cutter. And it was fascinating to meet and get to know Stan Honey, the phenomenal ocean racer, navigator, and entrepreneur who received the Far Horizons Award, and his wife Sally (twice Rolex Yachtswoman of the Year!). I could go on and on about all the remarkable sailors and wonderful people we met and talked with over the two days we were there in New York.

2018 CCA Award Winners    Photo © Dan Nerney

With fellow Yalies and CCA members at the Awards ceremony (right to left): racing champion Steve Taylor, offshore racing record-holder Stan Honey, me, yacht designer and Arctic voyager Bill Cook. Photo courtesy of Dan Nerney.

CCA burgeeThe Cruising Club of America is an international organization dedicated to offshore voyaging and “adventurous use of the sea” through efforts to improve seamanship, the design of seaworthy yachts, safe yachting procedures and environmental awareness. The CCA was founded in 1922 and today has approximately 1300 members with great experience in offshore passage making. The CCA also organizes the Newport to Bermuda Race together with the Royal Bermuda Yacht Club.

Mexican flag

CCA burgee flying from CELESTE in Mexico

Seth and I are both members of the CCA and, as we said in our acceptance remarks, simply being part of an organization made up of such outstanding people – both as individuals and as sailors – is a great compliment, and to be recognized for our sailing by the club, a real honor. We’ve been very fortunate to be able to sail “two-handed” (alone together) across oceans from such a young age, and, of course, doing so – rather than crewing for older, more experienced sailors – has meant we’ve learned pretty much everything the hard way: by making mistakes. We have the distinction, for example, of having run aground in every ocean… (One of my favorite quotations is: “Show me a sailor who hasn’t run aground, and I’ll show you a liar!”  – Hal Roth in How to Sail Around the World) … and our boat repair skills were all learned by doing. So we both think of ourselves more as lucky sailors than expert ones, with enough stubbornness and determination not to let a mishap here and there deter us. So thank you, to the whole CCA, for this incredible honor!

(More about the award in this CCA press release and in this Cruising World magazine article.)


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Not too late for summer reading!

It will probably come as no surprise that I love to read about outdoor adventures, ashore and afloat. So when we finished our summer’s sailing this year and received our big stack of waiting mail, I was excited to see the Summer issue of Misadventures magazine. Misadventures

Of course it’s always thrilling to see my own writing in print, but most of the fun is seeing what else is in there. This issue was full of fascinating tales of guiding on the Inca Trail, becoming a park ranger in retirement, and advocating for public lands as well as fun stuff like a recipe for campfire Bibimbap. The theme of the issue was Landfall, which is of course a central part of offshore sailing (or at least, one hopes so!) My own piece was about the magic of landfall to a seafarer, that exhilarating – and sometimes bittersweet – moment when you first sight land on the horizon after days or weeks at sea. Misadventures-2

Misadventures is written by all kinds of adventuresome women and I was honored to be among them this summer. The magazine was started to celebrate women and the outdoors, and while it’s certainly inspirational to women and girls, it’s also just a good read about the great outdoors and great pursuits!  The Landfall issue is still available in stores, or on the magazine’s website. And while most of the print articles aren’t online, the site has lots of other interesting stories!

 


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50,000 sea miles

Setting moon on Pacific crossing

Moon setting at dawn on our second Pacific crossing

So, to spill the beans… this summer when we were all out-of-touch and offline, we were sailing across the Pacific again. This second Pacific Ocean crossing was quite different from our first one in 2007, but more on that in a later post. I’m still processing the whole experience in my head (and in my photo file folders!), so for now this post is just a fun little look back:  Continue reading


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Stories in Print Around the World!

It’s been great to see my sailing articles in magazines all around the world this spring! Starting over in Great Britain, my piece about voyaging to the Alaskan Arctic in a wooden (cold-molded) boat was featured in the beautiful publication Classic Boat! Here is a PDF of the article which appeared in the April edition.

cropped-celeste-and-tidewater-glacier.jpg

Across the Pond, in New England, Ocean Navigator featured my article “A Penchant for the Primitive” about our twelve years voyaging aboard rather primitive boats! (I’ll preempt the obvious comment that our boats have been primitive by modern standards, not by, say, the standards of Captain Cook or the Spanish Armada…). Here is a PDF of the article which appeared in the May/June issue.

 

Seth navigating

Seth navigating. No, nautical charts aren’t just décor for seaside B&Bs…

Also on the East Coast, Cruising World magazine’s April issue published one of my shots as their “Big Photo”, alongside a short piece I wrote about a magical encounter with orca whales in Alaska. The piece is now online here.

Orca

Orca surfacing off Kodiak Island (this was not the “big photo” in the magazine – you’ll have to click on the link above for that! 🙂

Jumping all the way across the Pacific to Australia, I was most honored to be asked to be one of the contributors to the very first edition of Sister Ship magazine, celebrating women sailors! As I’ve been so excited about our new-to-us stacking dinghy this year, I decided to write a piece entitled “My Perfect Dinghy”. You can buy the digital magazine here and I’ll let you know when I have a PDF to share! Congratulations to Jackie and Shelley and everyone who has made this magazine become a reality! Here’s to many more issues! cropped-kelp-and-dinghy.jpg


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All Blue Water Boats Should Steer Themselves

So says Yves Gélinas, the incredibly accomplished and innovative sailor who invented the Cape Horn wind vane, and Seth and I agree wholeheartedly!Strong SE wind

Twelve years ago, Seth and I and two friends set off on our circumnavigation aboard Heretic with no self-steering gear at all. No electronic autopilot and no mechanical wind vane. We both came from racing (round-the-buoys) backgrounds and were used to hand-steering boats to get the best out of them at each and every moment. With four people taking turns at the helm, it was possible to make ocean passages like that, but it wasn’t much fun and it wasn’t very sustainable (in the most literal sense of that word, as in, able to continue indefinitely) for longer passages.

Cold sailing

Hand-steering Heretic off Rhode Island in November 2006. Me on the left, one of our friends – John – at the helm.

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An interview and an article

A couple of links for readers who are interested:

Our partner Katadyn has a new blog  and recently interviewed us by phone for it – the interview is up online here. Approaching Polar pack ice, Arctic Ocean_AlpineAire and Optimus Heat

And Classic Boat magazine just published their April issue, with my piece about sailing in the Arctic on a wooden classic as one of the cover stories! CBApril18-print-cover

I promise to catch up on our posts about the California coast soon!


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Critter Post 7: Atlantic Blue Tang

A big departure from my earlier Critter Posts: this one doesn’t live in Alaska and doesn’t breathe air! The Blue Tang is a reef fish native to the tropical Atlantic, so with this Critter Post, we’re harkening back to Seth’s and my global circumnavigation aboard HERETIC, during which we snorkeled with Blue Tangs in the Caribbean on the way out (2006/7) and the way home (2010).Blue Tangs-3

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